Who is Eric Warner?

"I wondered how far I should turn out faithful to that ideal conception of one's own personality every man sets up for himself secretly." - Joseph Conrad
Come see my newest monologue, “A Life in Tending” on January 5th and 10th, 2014.
Click on the picture to go to the Lifeline Theatre site and buy your tickets!  
"A few years ago Eric Warner broke into the abandoned Purple Hotel, just to explore. ‘Cause he’s always been curious about it. Not because he is a hoodlum. Inside the hotel he found his grandma’s house. ‘A Life in Tending’ is a multimedia monologue, a tour through a decrepit Chicago landmark, a story about how our identities can be tied to a place, and what changes when that place deteriorates or vanishes"

Come see my newest monologue, “A Life in Tending” on January 5th and 10th, 2014.

Click on the picture to go to the Lifeline Theatre site and buy your tickets!  

"A few years ago Eric Warner broke into the abandoned Purple Hotel, just to explore. ‘Cause he’s always been curious about it. Not because he is a hoodlum. Inside the hotel he found his grandma’s house. ‘A Life in Tending’ is a multimedia monologue, a tour through a decrepit Chicago landmark, a story about how our identities can be tied to a place, and what changes when that place deteriorates or vanishes"

Listen to my story “The Companion” on the 2nd Story podcast! 

Listen to my story “The Companion” on the 2nd Story podcast! 

Here’s an interview with me in the Sarah Terez-Rosenblum’s Chicago Sun Times blog! 

Here’s an interview with me in the Sarah Terez-Rosenblum’s Chicago Sun Times blog! 

Listen to a live recording of “Plateau Point” on Soundcloud! Click on the image and you can stream or download it. 

Listen to a live recording of “Plateau Point” on Soundcloud! Click on the image and you can stream or download it. 

AFTER I tell “Plateau Point” in the Kindness of Strangers Festival, and AFTER I tell a story with Story Sessions, I’m going to be telling a story with “Your Being Ridiculous”, a fantastic show that I told a story with this past summer. 
Come check me out November 16th & the 23rd at Mary’s Attic in Chicago! 

AFTER I tell “Plateau Point” in the Kindness of Strangers Festival, and AFTER I tell a story with Story Sessions, I’m going to be telling a story with “Your Being Ridiculous”, a fantastic show that I told a story with this past summer. 

Come check me out November 16th & the 23rd at Mary’s Attic in Chicago! 

I’m telling a story with the fantastic Story Sessions here in Chicago!
Here’s some info at ya: 
Story Sessions will chill your bones and warm your heart on October 27th at City Winery. Seven performers will share personal stories inspired by “Into the Darkness”. These haunting tales range from strange encounters and spiritual awakenings to private collections of the road less traveled. 
With humor, intrigue and an element of surprise, these storytellers will take you to the dark side.Featuring storytellers,Lisa ScottWilly NastJudi GoshenEric WarnerShay DeGrandisKareem KhubchandaniandLynne Jordan Hosted by Deanna MoffittProduced by Jill Howe and Rachael Smith
 Click on the picture to go to the Story Sessions page and get your tickets! 
I’m super excited to perform at City Winery. I saw Grant Lee Phillips play there last year, and getting the chance to perform on the same stage he once did is awesome. 

I’m telling a story with the fantastic Story Sessions here in Chicago!

Here’s some info at ya: 

Story Sessions will chill your bones and warm your heart on October 27th at City Winery. Seven performers will share personal stories inspired by “Into the Darkness”. These haunting tales range from strange encounters and spiritual awakenings to private collections of the road less traveled.

With humor, intrigue and an element of surprise, these storytellers will take you to the dark side.

Featuring storytellers,

Lisa Scott

Willy Nast

Judi Goshen

Eric Warner

Shay DeGrandis

Kareem Khubchandani

and

Lynne Jordan 

Hosted by Deanna Moffitt

Produced by Jill Howe and Rachael Smith

 
Click on the picture to go to the Story Sessions page and get your tickets! 

I’m super excited to perform at City Winery. I saw Grant Lee Phillips play there last year, and getting the chance to perform on the same stage he once did is awesome. 

"Plateau Point" my story in the Side Project Theatre’s 2nd Annual Festival of Storytelling, in Chicago, IL. Each night we’ll have three storytellers telling short tales of the theme of the Festival, "The Kindness of Strangers". Then we’ll feature a 50 minute piece on that theme from myself, Amy Sumpter, and Kim Morris. "Plateau Point" is Sunday through Wednesday, October 20th through October 23rd. Get more info and tickets at www.TheSideProject.net, and find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/thesideprojecttheatre!

"Plateau Point" is in the Side Project Theatre’s 2nd Annual Festival of Storytelling

       image

Hello People of Earth! Please come and see my 3rd hour long monologue, “Plateau Point”, as part of “The Kindness of Strangers”; The Side Project Theatre’s 2nd Annual Festival of Storytelling. 
I’m pulling double duty of performing, and also co-curating this year’s festival with Kim Morris, and Adam Webster. 
This is a very personal story for me, and we’ve gathered an amazing array of storytellers, so I would love it if you could see the show. You shan’t regret it! 
Here’s some info!

More than 40 storytellers converge in The Side Project Theatre’s second annual Festival of Storytelling, featuring a rotating mix of first-time and experienced tellers, accompanied by live music.
In addition to an array of 5- and 10-minute stories, each night will feature a longer piece by Kim Morris, Eric Warner or Amy Sumpter, who will each headline a different week of the Festival. 
Through the intimate act of storytelling, each teller will share heartwarming, heartbreaking, and powerful personal stories about how strangers h
ave affected their lives.

October 20 – November 6, 2013
Sundays through Wednesdays at 7:30 pm
The Side Project Theatre, 1439 W. Jarvis, Chicago, IL. 60626

All Tickets: $15 
(Rogers Park rush $10 for all unsold tickets at the door with ID showing residence in ZIP Codes 60626 or 60645)
Get those tickets here: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/461132

ABOUT THE PERFORMERS:

October 20-23:
ERIC WARNER
 remembers hearing: ‘Your father was a monster.’ Those words have stayed with him his entire life, as has his own question, ‘Is that all he was?’ “Plateau Point” is a story about a father and son who barely knew each other, and about choices. Which are more powerful, which shape us more, the stories that we create for ourselves, or those that we know to be true?

October 27-30:
AMY SUMPTER
 has a dream and that dream is being sabotaged by jobs, debt and maybe Amy Sumpter? Sumpter explores how you follow your dream, even when you feel like the world is falling apart. 

November 3-6:
KIM MORRIS 
will explore a series of small, seemingly innocuous moments between strangers that inevitably have a profound cumulative effect. 


A review for "The Lord Loves a Workin' Man"!

Here is a review from KDHX, the local independent radio station in St. Louis, for my St. Lou Fringe performance! Click on the post title to go to the website and read it (Or just read it here!), and other reviews of St. Lou Fringe shows. 

"The Lord Loves a Working Man"

As the stage lights went up on Eric Warner sitting at the lone, school-desk for his monologue “The Lord Loves a Working Man” at the Kranzberg Arts Center Black Box Theatre, the house lights stayed dark.


”Can you turn the house lights up, please?” were the first words out of Warner’s mouth, spoken with a touch of meekness.


It was a fitting start to his monologue, a 50-minute-long float through the memories of Warner’s life, unchronologically drifting from childhood to his 31st birthday. Throughout, one conflict holds his story together: the fear of the unknown, and the desire to conquer the unknown. And that sort of conflict makes for one anxious man.


He stammered like Ira Glass on fast forward and seemed nervous, giving the audience the upper hand, but always had control. He didn’t stop when the audience laughed, nor did he chuckle at his own jokes—he rolled straight through. The lack of smugness or pretension was endearing, and after the first 10 minutes, he hit his pace and stride without losing a filter of anxiousness in his story telling.


The main line of the monologue dealt with his adventure west from Chicago to build houses with a group of men. With no experience, he recounts planing lumber, failing to lift heavy things and building a house, He rambles through the men’s characters, similar to him, touching upon the pains of pulling oneself up by the bootstraps. It’s all set against a fixation on Teddy Roosevelt and his Bull Moose tenacity. Warner sees a role model in his independence, and grapples with his own failures to emulate the tales he reads in a Roosevelt biography.


The house brackets tales of a jumpy chronology, hitting childhood, young adulthood and the recent past. He hits his major sweet spot as he recounts his first visit to the Registrar’s Office at St. Louis Community College - Florissant Valley. After recounting the registrar asking him about his career goals, a stream of consciousness dribbles out of Warner’s mouth for the better part of two minutes, as he stumbles through careers he’s interested in, only to follow up with a reason why it wouldn’t work. It’s generalized anxiety at its purest, but unguarded.


He ends the monologue on a seemingly hopeless note: the house isn’t finished, but it will get done. However, his 10 days are over, and he’s made no progress on his relationship or career aspirations—he’s still reeling from a break up, broke and jobless. The light fades as he repeats “I guess I’ll be a…I guess I’ll be a…I guess I’ll be a…”


Warner’s monologue was the one show I felt I needed to see again. Not so much because I enjoyed it—I did—but because I found myself reaching back throughout his ramble, trying to piece together his carefully scattered memories. He leaves a trail of crumbs leading the listener from his childhood fears to young adulthood to adulthood, drawing faint but weighty lines between a child’s fear of crossing the street to career and relationship anxiety with a gracefully tumbling stage presence.

Johnny Buse, KDHX

"You're Being Ridiculous"

I’m telling a story with “You’re Being Ridiculous” on July 13th and 20th in Chicago, IL. Go check out my short Q/A and come and see the show! 

Here is a photo taken by Steven Ley of my show “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man” in the St. Lou Fringe Fest on June 22. Click on the picture to go to Steve’s Flickr page and check out more pics from my show, plus all of his other great photos. 

Here is a photo taken by Steven Ley of my show “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man” in the St. Lou Fringe Fest on June 22. Click on the picture to go to Steve’s Flickr page and check out more pics from my show, plus all of his other great photos. 

My Fringe performance page!

Hello! Go here to get tickets to see me perform my monologue “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man” on June 22 at 2:30 and June 23 at 1:00 at the Kranzberg Cabaret Theatre in St. Louis, MO. 

Here is a trailer for my monologue “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man”, which I will be performing in the St. Louis Fringe Fest on June 22 and June 23rd. Go to www.StlFringe.com for more info, or just look above or below this posting to go directly to my Fringe artist page to buy tickets. 

(Source: youtube.com)

A promo image for “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man”

A promo image for “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man”

A teaser trailer for my monologue “The Lord Loves a Workin’ Man”. Now, you may be wondering, “Eric, how does this trailer give me any idea of what your show is about?”

And I would say, “But look at the way that dude rolls his shoulders! Plus, it’s got a guy getting shot in the belly with a cannon.” 

(Source: youtube.com)